Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Clicking Noise on a Foreman Grill

Print this articleGeorge Foreman grills can run on gas fuel, using small tanks of propane or connections to a home's gas lines. When using these grills, clicking noises are to be expected because they're part of the gas firing process. However, erratic clicking can indicate grill problems, and clicking that's not associated with the burners may be a sign that something else is wrong with the grill and needs to be addressed.

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The ignition system of the Foreman gas grill uses a small spark to light the gas flowing into the burner. Just like an indoor gas oven, the burners will automatically click as they start to light. This clicking is a sign that the burner is functioning correctly. It's only when the burner doesn't light, or keeps clicking even after the burner is lit, that the sound indicates a serious issue.

Slow Clicking

If your grill ignition system is clicking slowly and your burners are slow to light, the problem could be the battery that your ignitor is using, which can fail or corrode over time. Check your battery and replace it if it's old. Also take the time to check your ignitor and clean its probes and attachments carefully to remove any dust or corrosion, which may also cause your burners to delay lighting.

Continual Clicking

If you hear continual clicking coming from your burners but your grill is operating correctly, the ignitor is not sensing that the burner has lit. This problem can occur when the ignitor becomes misaligned with the grill or when your wiring fails. Realign the ignitor probe according to your Foreman manual's instructions and check your burner wiring for any obvious signs of damage.

Other Types of Clicking

If clicking noises are coming from other parts of your grill, shut down the burners, turn off the gas valve, and see if you can locate the source of the sound. Sometimes in cold weather the expansion of the metal as you use your grill can cause normal clicking and popping noises. Oils or sugars may have spilled on your burner and started to crackle. But it can also mean that a supply valve for your gas line is malfunctioning and needs to be replaced before you use your grill again.

ReferencesKalamazooGourmet: Grill Performance TroubleshootingBarbequLovers: 5 Tips for Troubleshooting Low Flame Output on your BBQ GrillGeorge Foreman: Grill Plate TroubleshootingRead Next:

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